ORIGINAL ARTICLE

https://eqrcode.co/a/kPRJUG

Correlation between Density and Mechanical Resistance of Soil Obtained with Probes of Different Geometries


ABSTRACT

An important soil variable is mechanical resistance, a feature that interacts with other soil properties such as bulk density, texture, moisture content and porosity. Hence a number of experimental investigations have been conducted to obtain a probe of better correlation with volumetric density and resistance to penetration. However, so far, there is no precise information on the technical requirements for the design of probes. The objective of this scientific research was determining the type of probe that ensures the correlation levels between volumetric density and resistance to penetration under different moisture conditions for a Ferrallitic Red Lixiviate soil, typical of Cuba. To meet this objective, eight types of probes (five cone-shaped and three wedge-shaped) with different geometric dimensions were designed and an experimental design of 2x3 factorial nature was executed, setting humidity, intermediate (28%) and high (35%), and three levels of volumetric density (1; 1,1 and 1,2 g∙cm-3). As a result of the experimentation, it was obtained that the wedge-shaped prismatic probe with 30o and base area of 520 mm2, presented the highest levels of correlation with the ASAE index (R2 = 0.95) and the volumetric density (R2 = 0.84), for moisture of 28%, resulting in the most accurate geometric form for estimating soil compaction.

Keywords: 

Compaction; cone index; sensors; volumetric density.

 


Currently, the growth of agriculture has intensified the use of natural resources in general, and particularly, it has accelerated many processes of soil degradation, which has adversely influenced crops.

Among the factors that have the greatest impact on crop yields, those related to soil properties stand out. An important soil variable is mechanical resistance, a characteristic that interacts with other soil properties such as bulk density, texture, moisture content and porosity (Saffih et al., 2009).

Compaction, measured through the mechanical resistance offered by the soil, is produced by the traffic of agricultural equipment, as well as by the inadequate management of tillage operations and the action of rainfall on the bare soil, among others causes, constitutes a detrimental effect on agricultural yields (Botta et al., 2002, 2007, Rodriguez & Valencia, 2012 and Olivet & Cobas, 2013).

Arvidsson et al. (2004) suggest that, depending on the type of soil and texture, soil moisture should be below the plastic limit (LP) during agricultural work, coinciding with several authors (Mueller et al., 2003) and Barzegar et al. (2004), that the most appropriate moisture content for mechanized agricultural work corresponds to 0.7 - 0.9 LP.

Numerous researchers and manufacturers have developed sensors for continuous (On-the-Go) measurement of soil properties (Adamchuk et al., 2004; Hall & Raper, 2005; Herrera et al., 2011 and Hemmat et al., 2013). Based on the measurement methods, a wide variety of prototypes of probes have been developed, however, in all cases probes of different geometries have been used, without referring to which is the optimal one.

Likewise, Johnson (2003), Chung et al. (2004), Chung & Sudduth (2006) and Nader et al. (2013) developed different models of the probe-soil interaction, aimed at clarifying this interaction process and to relate the reading of the probes to the level of compaction of the soil under different humidity conditions. Some of these models could not be validated under different soil conditions and others have the drawback that they do not take into account some geometric parameters such as the length and areas of the lateral faces of the probes.

Other investigations have been aimed at detecting the degree of soil compaction using non-invasive methods, based on the application of electromagnetic fields to the soil (Martínez et al., 2010, 2011), however, they could not be applied due to the simultaneous influence of factors such as moisture and organic matter content of the soil.

In the particular case of the present study, a number of experimental investigations have been conducted by Chukwu & Bowers (2005), Hall & Raper (2005), Chung et al. (2006), Chung & Sudduth (2006) and Sharifi & Mohsenimanesh (2012), in order to obtain the probe of the best correlation with the apparent density and resistance to penetration. However, until now there is no precise information on the technical requirements for the design of probes, hence the objective of this investigation was to determine the type of probe that ensures possible levels of correlation between apparent density and resistance to penetration under different humidity conditions for a leached Red Ferrallitic soil, typical of Cuba.

The experimental investigations were carried out at the Soil Channel Laboratory, at the Agricultural Mechanization Center (CEMA) of the Faculty of Technical Sciences at the Agrarian University of Havana (UNAH), located in San José de la Lajas Municipality at Mayabeque Province.

The soil under study is a Red Leachate Ferrallitic soil according to the latest classification in force in the country (Hernández et al., 2015), from the agricultural area of San José de las Lajas, in the Province of Mayabeque, Cuba, with a plasticity index of 30.4%, plastic limit of 30.7% and 3.01% of organic matter (González, 2008).

To carry out the experiments, eight types of probes were designed, five with a cone shape and three with a wedge shape. Their geometric characteristics are shown in Table 1.

Probe and stem lengths were kept constant in all cases. The cone with an angle of 30º and a base area of 130 mm2 corresponds to the standard cone of the American Society for Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ASABE). As material for the construction of the probes, 1045 steel was used according to the standard of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) and a surface finish of 0.32 µm was applied.

TABLE 1. 

Geometric characteristics of probes subject to experimentation

Geometry

  • Angle

  • (ᵒ)

  • Base area

  • (mm2)

Geometry

  • Angle

  • (ᵒ)

  • Base area

  • (mm2)

30°130 mm2
30°130 mm2
30°260 mm2
30°260 mm2
30°520 mm2
30°520 mm2
45°260 mm2
60°260 mm2

The soil samples for each experimental variant were placed in seven metal boxes of uniform dimensions (Fig. 1). They were weighed to achieve a uniform amount of soil in each tank.

FIGURE 1. 

Dimensions of the soil tanks.

The determination of the humidity and bulk density of the soil was carried out according to NC 67: (2000). The weighing of the samples before and after drying was carried out with a College electronic balance with an accuracy of 0.01 g. In addition, a grid (Fig. 2) was used in order to unify the taking of samples and three samples of soil were taken with Kopecki cylinders from each container following the diagonal and away from the edges.

The soil previously deposited in the boxes was compacted with a mechanical press until all the boxes had similar levels of humidity and apparent density. The boxes were divided into 25 quadrants to take the samples (Fig. 2 a). The three red dots indicate the grids for sampling bulk density and moisture content. In the rest of the squares, the penetration resistance obtained with the standard ASABE cone (green dots) was measured and also the penetration resistance obtained with the other geometries (blue dots).

The penetration resistance was determined using the CEMA-08 durometer (Fig. 2 b), designed to withstand loads up to 3 kN with an appreciation of 2 N. The penetration resistance was calculated by dividing the penetration force, observed on the digital indicator of the durometer, by the area of the cone base or wedge undergoing experimentation. The dimensions of the cone base or wedge were measured with a micrometer with an appreciation of up to 0.01 mm.

The determination of the cone index (ASABE standard) of the soil was measured with a FIELDSCOUT Digital Penetrometer Model: SC 900 SN: 328, with an appreciation of ± 1,25 cm, ± 15 PSI (± 103 kPa).

FIGURE 2. 

a) Scheme for taking samples of resistance to penetration, bulk density and humidity. b) CEMA-08 Durometer.

Soil moisture and bulk density were defined as independent variables, taking two moisture levels: intermediate (28%) and high (35%) and three levels of bulk density (1, 1.1 and 1.2 g cm-3), resulting in a 2x3 factorial design for a total of six treatments to be performed during the experimental runs.

For each treatment, three repetitions were performed. The maximum and minimum levels of bulk density were selected, from a pre-experiment, in order to reach values of resistance to penetration in a wide range between 0.5 and 6 MPa. As a dependent variable, the resistance to penetration measured with the probes of different geometric shapes was established.

Table 2 shows the results of experimental investigations aimed at determining the relationships between resistance to penetration, measured with probes of different geometric dimensions, with the cone index ASABE and with the dry bulk density of the soil.

TABLE 2. 

Relationship between penetration resistances obtained with probes of different geometry with ASABE cone index and dry volumetric density, for two moisture levels

Type of probe

  • Moisture

  • H (%)

  • ASABE cone index

  • IC(MPa)

  • Dry bulk density

  • γ (g/cm3)

Regression EquationR2DegreeRegression EquationR2Degree
ASABE cone 30ox13028 y = 11,874 x - 11,4410,66MF
35 y = 1,4787x - 1,08150,16D
Cone 30ox26028y = 0,777 x - 0,03830,86F*y = 8,2556x - 7,82310,60MF
35y = 0,585 x + 0,10980,88Fy = 0,7504x - 0,42740,17D
Cone 30ox52028y = 0,5113x + 0,01230,93FFy = 5,4367x -5,14940,47D
35y = 0,6191x + 0,04070,94FFy = 1,5109x -1,42570,70MF
Cone 45ox26028y = 1,0719x + 0,0620,89Fy = 14,566x - 14,1040,33D
35y = 0,903x + 0,16440,86Fy = 1,8399x - 1,46920,33D
Cone 60ox26028y = 0,8931x + 0,6050,94FFy = 13,807x - 13,3070,81F
35y = 0,3596x + 0,42210,20Dy = 1,1293x - 0,70990,30D
Wedge 30ox13028y = 1,0121x + 0,06340,74MFy = 11,743 x -11,1960,72MF
35y = 0,8559x + 0,16980,87Fy = 0,4806x + 0,20960,01D
Wedge 30ox26028y = 0,806 x - 0,040,94FFy = 9,0656 x -8,67950,75MF
35y = 0,9892x + 0,01110,60MFy = 4,6887 x -4,68430,67MF
Wedge 30ox52028y = 0,8587x + 0,04560,93FFy = 10,914x -10,5810,84F
35y = 0,5995x + 0,12240,95FFy = 1,483x -1,1380,33D

*Leyenda para el grado de relación entre las variables: FF-significativamente fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,90); F-fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,80); MF- medianamente fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,60); D- débil (R2 ≤ 0,59).

* Legend for degree of correlation: FF-significantly strong (R2 ≥ 0.90); F-strong (R2 ≥ 0.80); moderately strong MF- (R2 ≥ 0.60); D- weak (R2 ≤ 0.59).

As it can be seen in the previous table, most of the geometries tested presented a strong degree of correlation with the ASABE cone index for the two humidity levels experienced, with the exception of the wedge with a base area of 260 mm2 at humidity of 35% and the wedge of 130 mm2 at humidity of 28%, which presented a moderately strong degree of correlation. The 60o cone, whose degree of correlation was weak for humidity of 35%, was also an exception.

The plot of the experimental points is shown in Fig. 3, as well as the line of best fit for the case of the cone and the wedge with angles of 30º and base area 520 mm2, for which the strongest degrees of correlation with the cone index ASABE were obtained for both humidity levels, resulting determination coefficients between R2 = 0.93 and R2 = 0.95.

FIGURE 3. 

Regression equation and coefficient of determination between the wedge indexes (IW) obtained with a wedge of 30ox520 mm2 and the cone index (IC) ASABE for each of the moisture levels under study.

The correlation analyzes between the resistance to penetration, obtained with the different probes, and the apparent density, presented a more different behavior, obtaining strong degrees of correlation only in the case of the 30o x 520 mm2 wedge and the 60o cone x 260 mm2, where the determination coefficients R2 were 0.84 and 0.81, respectively, for the humidity level of 28%. In treatments with a high humidity level (35%), only moderately strong degrees of correlation were obtained with the apparent density for the cases of the cone of 30o x 520 mm2 and the wedge of 30o x 260 mm2.

Regarding the ASABE cone index and its correlation with the apparent density, the results of the experiments showed a weak correlation (R2 = 0.16) for the high humidity level and a moderately strong correlation (R2 = 0.60) for the humidity of 28% (Fig. 4). Similar results were obtained by Vega (2008) during the continuous sampling of the cone index in Red Ferrallitic soils in cane areas of Mayabeque Province, while Hall & Raper (2005) report, a similar determination coefficient between the cone index and the bulk density (R2 = 0.55), but for a sandy-silty soil (71.6% sand; 17.4% silt; 11% clay).

FIGURE 4. 

Regression equation and coefficient of determination between the ASABE cone index and the volumetric density for each of the moisture levels under study.

These results contrast with those obtained for another type of soil by Ramírez & Salazar (2006), who report, for an Andisol (Marinilla-La Montañita, Colombia) a close relationship (R2 = 0.95) of the apparent density with resistance to the penetration obtained with a cone penetrometer 30o and 10 mm in diameter at the base, within an experimental range with densities between 0.3 and 1.0 g ∙ cm-3 and resistance to penetration between 2.0 and 4.2 MPa.

In the same way, the results obtained show that the resistance to penetration obtained with the 30o x 520 mm2 wedge-shaped prismatic probe presented the highest degrees of correlation, both with the ASABE cone index, for both humidity levels, as with the bulk density for the humidity level of 28% (Fig. 5).

FIGURE 5. 

Regression equation and coefficient of determination between wedge indexes (IW) obtained with a wedge of 30 x 520 mm2 and the volumetric density for each of the moisture levels under study.

Similar results, although in a type of sandy-silty soil (71.6% sand; 17.4% silt; 11% clay), reported Hall & Raper (2005), who obtained higher values of the coefficient of determination (R2 = 0,74) with a wedge-shaped prismatic probe 30o x 620 mm2 in base area.

The wedge-shaped prismatic probe with an angle of 30o and a base area of 520 mm2, presented the highest levels of correlation with the ASABE cone index (R2 = 0.95) and the apparent density (R2 = 0.84), for a humidity of 28%. Hence, this probe has the best characteristics for detecting the resistance to penetration of a leached Red Ferrallitic soil, typical of Cuba, since it would provide information, not only regarding resistance to penetration, but also referred to soil apparent density, in this case measuring at humidity levels, about 28%.

 

REFERENCIAS BIBLIOGRÁFICAS

ADAMCHUK, V.I.; HUMMEL, J.; MORGAN, M.; UPADHYAYA, S.: “On-the-go soil sensors for precision agriculture”, Computers and electronics in agriculture, 44(1): 71-91, 2004, ISSN: 0168-1699.

ARVIDSSON, J.; KELLER, T.; GUSTAFSSON, K.: “Specific draught for mouldboard plough, chisel plough and disc harrow at different water contents”, Soil and Tillage Research, 79(2): 221-231, 2004, ISSN: 0167-1987.

BARZEGAR, A.; HASHEMI, A.; HERBERT, S.; ASOODAR, M.: “Interactive effects of tillage system and soil water content on aggregate size distribution for seedbed preparation in Fluvisols in southwest Iran”, Soil and Tillage Research, 78(1): 45-52, 2004, ISSN: 0167-1987.

BOTTA, G.; JORAJURIA, D.; DRAGHI, L.: “Influence of the axle load, tyre size and configuration on the compaction of a freshly tilled clayey soil”, Journal of Terramechanics, 39(1): 47-54, 2002, ISSN: 0022-4898.

BOTTA, G.F.; POZZOLO, O.; BOMBEN, M.; TOURN, M.; EDUARDO, S.; ROSATTO, H.G.; GILI, A.A.; RESSIA, J.M.; ALONSO, D.; VAZQUEZ, J.: “Aplicación del tráfico controlado en la cosecha de maíz (Zea mays L.): Efecto sobre rendimientos del cultivo y las propiedades físicas del suelo”, Agro-Ciencia, 23: 23-29, 2007, ISSN: 0716-1689.

CHUKWU, E.; BOWERS, C.: “Instantaneous multiple-depth soil mechanical impedance sensing from a moving vehicle”, Transactions of the ASAE, 48(3): 885-894, 2005, ISSN: 0001-2351.

CHUNG, S.; SUDDUTH, K.: “Soil failure models for vertically operating and horizontally operating strength sensors”, Transactions of the ASABE, 49(4): 851-863, 2006, ISSN: 0001-2351.

CHUNG, S.; SUDDUTH, K.; CAMERON, R.; LUZIO, G.; KAUFFMAN, S.; GROHMANN, K.: “Characterization of cone index and tillage draft data to define design parameters for an on-the-go soil strength profile sensor”, Agricultural and biosystems engineering, 5(1): 10-20, 2004.

CHUNG, S.; SUDDUTH, K.; HUMMEL, J.: “Design and validation of an on-the-go soil strength profile sensor”, Transactions of the ASABE, 49(1): 5-14, 2006, ISSN: 0001-2351.

GONZÁLEZ, O.: Modelación de la compactación provocada, por el tráfico de los neumáticos de los vehículos agrícolas, en suelos en condiciones de laboratorio, Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH), PhD. Thesis, San José de Las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, 134 p., 2008.

HALL, H.; RAPER, R.: “Development and concept evaluation of an on-the-go soil strength measurement system”, Transactions of the ASAE, 48(2): 469-477, 2005, ISSN: 2151-0032, e-ISSN: 2151-0040.

HEMMAT, A.; BINANDEH, A.; GHAISARI, J.; KHORSANDI, A.: “Development and field testing of an integrated sensor for on-the-go measurement of soil mechanical resistance”, Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 198: 61-68, 2013, ISSN: 0924-4247.

HERNÁNDEZ, A.; PÉREZ, J.; BOSCH, D.; CASTRO, N.: Clasificación de los suelos de Cuba, Ed. Ediciones INCA, Mayabeque, Mayabeque, Cuba, 93 p., 2015, ISBN: 978-959-7023-77-7.

HERRERA, S.M.; IGLESIAS, C.C.; LARA, C.D.; GONZÁLEZ, C.O.; LÓPEZ, B.E.: “Desarrollo de un sensor para la medición continúa de la compactación del suelo”, Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias, 20(1): 06-11, 2011, ISSN: 1010-2760, e-ISSN: 2071-0054.

JOHNSON, J.B.: A statistical micromechanical theory of cone penetration in granular materials, no. TR-03-3, Inst. US Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center, (ERDC/CRREL), USA, 2003.

MARTÍNEZ, R.; RODRÍGUEZ, R.; PÉREZ, A.: “Sensoramiento del estado de compactación del suelo mediante un campo magnético variable”, Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias, 20(1): 25-30, 2011, ISSN: 1010-2760, e-ISSN: 2071-0054.

MARTÍNEZ, R.A.; RODRÍGUEZ, R.; PÉREZ, A.: “Influencia de la frecuencia de excitación y la distancia entre enrollados durante el sensoramiento de la conductividad eléctrica del suelo mediante un campo magnético variable”, Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias, 19(4): 17-23, 2010, ISSN: 1010-2760, e-ISSN: 2071-0054.

MUELLER, L.; SCHINDLER, U.; FAUSEY, N.R.; LAL, R.: “Comparison of methods for estimating maximum soil water content for optimum workability”, Soil and Tillage Research, 72(1): 9-20, 2003, ISSN: 0167-1987.

NADER, B.M.; SHARIFI, A.; ALIMARDANI, R.; HEMMAT, A.; KEYHANI, A.; LOONSTRA, E.; WEISSKOPF, P.; STETTLER, M.; KELLER, T.: “Use of a triple-sensor fusion system for on-the-go measurement of soil compaction”, Soil and Tillage Research, 128: 44-53, 2013, ISSN: 0167-1987.

NC 67: 2000: Geotecnia. Determinación del contenido de humedad de los suelos y rocas en el laboratorio (Sust. a las NC 54-236:83 y NC54-353:86)., vig de 2000.

OLIVET, R.Y.E.; COBAS, H.D.: “Balance energético de dos aperos de labranza en un Fluvisol para el cultivo del boniato (Ipomoea batatas Lam)”, Revista Ciencias Técnicas Agropecuarias, 22(2): 21-25, 2013, ISSN: 1010-2760, e-ISSN: 2071-0054.

RAMÍREZ, R.; SALAZAR, C.: Cambios de la resistencia a la penetración en un suelo con diferentes sistemas de manejo y su relación con algunas propiedades físicas en un andisol-Marinilla La Montañita, [en línea], 2006, Disponible en:http://www.unalmed.edu.co/esceocien/ramiro_ramírez.html.

RODRIGUEZ, L.A.; VALENCIA, J.J.: “Impacto del tráfico de equipos durante la cosecha de caña de azúcar (Saccharum officinarum)”, Revista Brasileira de Engenharia Agrícola e Ambiental, 16(10): 1128-1136, 2012, ISSN: 1415-4366.

SAFFIH, H.K.; DÉFOSSEZ, P.; RICHARD, G.; CUI, Y.-J.; TANG, A.-M.; CHAPLAIN, V.: “A method for predicting soil susceptibility to the compaction of surface layers as a function of water content and bulk density”, Soil and Tillage Research, 105(1): 96-103, 2009, ISSN: 0167-1987.

SHARIFI, A.; MOHSENIMANESH, A.: “Soil mechanical resistance measurement by an unique multi-cone tips horizontal sensor”, International Agrophysics, 26(1): 61-64, 2012, ISSN: 0236-8722.

VEGA, E.: Estudio del efecto de la compactación del suelo Ferralítico Rojo compactado durante la cosecha mecanizada de la caña de azúcar. Estudio de caso: CPA Amistad Cuba-Nicaragua, Universidad Agraria de La Habana, Eng. Thesis, San José de las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, 2008.

 

NOTES

[6]

The mention of trademarks of specific equipment, instruments or materials is for identification purposes, there being no promotional commitment in relation to them, neither by the authors nor by the publisher.

 

 

 

 

Ernesto Ramos-Carbajal, Profesor, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas (UNACH), Escuela de Estudios Agropecuarios de Mezcalapa Carretera Chicoase-Malpaso, km 28+800 Copainala, Chiapas, México, C.P. 29620, e-mail: erc670819@gmail.com

Arturo Martínez-Rodríguez, Profesor Titular, Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH), Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, Departamento de Ingeniería, Carretera Tapaste y Autopista Nacional km 23 ½ San José de Las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, CP 32700, Apartado Postal 18-19, e-mail: armaro466@gmail.com

Armando E. García de la Figal-Costales, Profesor Titular, Universidad Agraria de La Habana (UNAH), Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, Departamento de Ingeniería, Carretera Tapaste y Autopista Nacional km 23 ½ San José de Las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, CP 32700, Apartado Postal 18-19, e-mail: areloy@unah.edu.cu

Geisy Hernández-Cuello, Investigador Auxiliar, Universidad Agraria de La Habana, Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas, Centro de Mecanización Agropecuaria, Carretera Tapaste y Autopista Nacional km 23 ½ San José de Las Lajas, Mayabeque, Cuba, CP 32700, Apartado Postal 18-19, e-mail: geisyh@unah.edu.cu

The authors of this work declare no conflict of interests.

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

 

ARTÍCULO ORIGINAL

 

Correlación entre densidad y resistencia mecánica del suelo obtenida con sondas de diferentes geometrías


RESUMEN

Una variable importante del suelo es la resistencia mecánica, característica que interactúa con otras propiedades del suelo como la densidad aparente, la textura, el contenido de humedad y la porosidad. De aquí que un sin número de investigaciones experimentales han sido conducidas a la obtención de la sonda de mejor correlación con la densidad volumétrica y la resistencia a la penetración. No obstante, hasta el momento no se cuenta con información técnica precisa, sobre los requerimientos técnicos, para el diseño de sondas, siendo objetivo de la presente investigación determinar el tipo de sonda que asegure posibles niveles de correlación entre la densidad volumétrica y la resistencia a la penetración bajo diferentes condiciones de humedad para un suelo Ferralítico Rojo Lixiviado, típico de Cuba. Para cumplir este objetivo, se diseñaron, ocho tipos de sondas (cinco con forma de cono y tres con forma de cuña) con diferentes dimensiones geométricas y se ejecutó un diseño experimental de naturaleza factorial 2x3, fijándose dos niveles de humedad, intermedio (28%) y alto (35%), y tres niveles de densidad volumétrica (1; 1,1 y 1,2 g∙cm-3). Como resultado de la experimentación se obtuvo que la sonda prismática en forma de cuña con 30o y área de la base 520 mm2, presentó los mayores niveles de correlación con el índice de cono ASAE (R2 = 0,95) y la densidad volumétrica (R2 = 0,84), para una humedad del 28%, resultando la forma geométrica más acertada para la estimación del grado de compactación del suelo.

Palabras clave: 

Compactación; índice de cono; sensores; densidad volumétrica.


En la actualidad el crecimiento de la agricultura ha intensificado el uso de los recursos naturales en general, y en particular ha acelerado muchos procesos de degradación de los suelos, lo que ha influido adversamente en los cultivos.

Dentro de los factores que mayor incidencia tienen en los rendimientos de los cultivos se destacan los relacionados con las propiedades del suelo. Una variable importante del suelo es la resistencia mecánica, característica que interactúa con otras propiedades del suelo como la densidad aparente, la textura, el contenido de humedad y la porosidad (Saffih et al., 2009).

La compactación, medida a través de la resistencia mecánica que ofrece el suelo, es producida por el tráfico de los equipos agrícolas, así como por el manejo inadecuado de las operaciones de labranza y la propia acción de las precipitaciones sobre el suelo descubierto, entre otras causas, constituye un efecto perjudicial sobre los rendimientos agrícolas (Botta et al., 2002, 2007; Rodriguez y Valencia, 2012; Olivet y Cobas, 2013).

Arvidsson et al. (2004) sugieren que, dependiendo del tipo de suelo y textura, durante las labores agrícolas la humedad del suelo debe ser inferior al límite plástico (LP), coincidiendo con varios autores, Mueller et al. (2003) y Barzegar et al. (2004), que el contenido de humedad más apropiado para la realización de labores agrícolas mecanizadas corresponde a 0,7 - 0,9 LP.

Numerosos investigadores y fabricantes han desarrollado sensores para la medición continua (On-the-Go) de las propiedades del suelo, (Adamchuk et al., 2004; Hall y Raper, 2005; Herrera et al., 2011; Hemmat et al., 2013). En función de los métodos de medición se han desarrollado una gran variedad de prototipos de sondas, sin embargo, en todos los casos se han utilizado sondas de diferentes geometrías, sin referir cual es la óptima

Asimismo, han sido desarrollados diferentes modelos Johnson (2003); Chung et al. (2004); Chung y Sudduth (2006); Nader et al. (2013); de la interacción sonda-suelo, dirigidos a esclarecer este proceso de interacción y poder relacionar la lectura de las sondas con el nivel de compactación del suelo bajo diferentes condiciones de humedad. Algunos de estos modelos no han podido ser validados en condiciones de suelos diferentes y otros presentan el inconveniente que no tienen en cuenta algunos parámetros geométricos como la longitud y áreas de las caras laterales de las sondas.

Otras investigaciones han estado dirigidas a la detección del grado de compactación del suelo empleando métodos no invasivos, basados en la aplicación de campos electromagnéticos al suelo Martínez et al. (2010, 2011), sin embargo, no han podido ser aplicados debido a la influencia simultánea de factores como la humedad y el contenido de materia orgánica del suelo.

En el caso particular que nos ocupa, un sin número de investigaciones experimentales han sido conducidas por Chukwu y Bowers (2005); Hall y Raper (2005); Chung et al. (2006); Chung y Sudduth (2006); Sharifi y Mohsenimanesh (2012), con vistas a la obtención de la sonda de mejor correlación con la densidad aparente y la resistencia a la penetración. No obstante, hasta el momento no se cuenta con información técnica precisa, sobre los requerimientos técnicos, para el diseño de sondas, de aquí que el objetivo de la presente investigación fue determinar el tipo de sonda que asegure posibles niveles de correlación entre la densidad aparente y la resistencia a la penetración bajo diferentes condiciones de humedad para un suelo Ferralítico Rojo Lixiviado, típico de Cuba.

Las investigaciones experimentales se realizaron en el Laboratorio Canal de Suelos, del Centro de Mecanización Agropecuaria (CEMA) de la Facultad de Ciencias Técnicas de la Universidad Agraria de la Habana (UNAH), ubicado en el municipio de San José de la Lajas, provincia Mayabeque..

El suelo objeto de estudio es un suelo Ferralítico Rojo Lixiviado según la última clasificación vigente en el país Hernández et al. (2015), proveniente de la zona agrícola de San José de las Lajas, en la Provincia de Mayabeque, Cuba, con un índice de plasticidad de 30,4%, limite plástico de 30,7% y 3,01% de materia orgánica (González, 2008).

Para la realización de los experimentos, se diseñaron, ocho tipos de sondas (cinco con forma de cono y tres con forma de cuña) con las características geométricas que se exponen en la Tabla 1.

En todos los casos se mantuvieron constantes las longitudes de la sonda y del vástago. El cono con ángulo de 30º y área de la base de 130 mm2 se corresponde con el cono estándar de la Sociedad Americana de Ingeniería Agrícola y Biológica (ASABE). Como material para la construcción de las sondas se empleó acero 1045 según la norma del American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) y se aplicó un acabado superficial de 0,32 µm.

TABLA 1. 

Características geométricas de las sondas objeto de experimentación

Geometría

  • Ángulo

  • (Grados)

  • Área de la base

  • (mm2)

Geometría

  • Ángulo

  • (Grados)

  • Área de la base

  • (mm2)

30°130 mm2
30°130 mm2
30°260 mm2
30°260 mm2
30°520 mm2
30°520 mm2
45°260 mm2
60°260 mm2

Las muestras de suelo para cada variante experimental fueron colocadas en siete cajas metálicas de dimensiones uniformes (Figura 1), siendo pesadas con vistas a lograr una cantidad de suelo uniforme en cada depósito.

FIGURA 1. 

Dimensiones de los depósitos de suelo.

La determinación de la humedad y densidad aparente del suelo se realizó según la NC 67: (2000). El pesaje de las muestras antes y después del secado, se realizó con una balanza electrónica marca College con precisión de 0,01 g. Además, se utilizó una rejilla cuadriculada (Figura 2) con el objetivo de unificar la toma de las muestras y se tomaron de cada recipiente tres muestras muestras de suelo con cilindros de Kopecki siguiendo la diagonal y alejado de los bordes.

El suelo previamente depositado en las cajas, era compactado con una prensa mecánica hasta que todas las cajas tuvieran similares niveles de humedad y densidad aparente. Las cajas fueron divididas en 25 cuadrantes para la toma de las muestras (Figura 2a). Los tres puntos rojos indican las cuadriculas para la toma de muestras de densidad aparente y contenido de humedad. En el resto de las cuadriculas se midió la resistencia a la penetración obtenida con el cono estándar ASABE (puntos verdes) y la resistencia a la penetración obtenida con las otras geometrías (puntos azules).

La resistencia a la penetración se determinó utilizando el durómetro CEMA-08 (Figura 2b), diseñado para soportar cargas hasta 3 kN con una apreciación de 2N. La resistencia a la penetración se calculó dividiendo la fuerza de penetración, observada en el indicador digital del durómetro, entre el área de la base del cono o la cuña sometidos a experimentación. Las dimensiones de la base del cono o la cuña fueron medidas con un micrómetro con apreciación hasta 0.01 mm.

La determinación del índice de cono (estándar ASABE) del suelo, se midió con un Penetrómetro digital FIELDSCOUT Modelo: SC 900 SN: 328, con una apreciación de ±1,25 cm, ±15 PSI (±103 kPa).

FIGURA 2. 

a) Esquema para la toma de muestras de resistencia a la penetración, densidad aparente y humedad. b) Durómetro CEMA-08.

Como variables independientes fueron definidas la humedad y la densidad aparente del suelo, tomándose dos niveles de humedad: intermedio (28%) y alto (35%) y tres niveles de densidad aparente (1; 1,1 y 1,2 g∙cm-3), resultando un diseño de naturaleza factorial 2x3 para un total de seis tratamientos a realizar durante las corridas experimentales.

Por cada tratamiento se realizaron tres repeticiones. Los niveles máximos y mínimos de densidad aparente se seleccionaron, a partir de un pre-experimento, con el fin de alcanzar valores de la resistencia a la penetración en un amplio rango entre 0,5 y 6 MPa. Como variable dependiente se estableció la resistencia a la penetración medida con las sondas de diferentes formas geométricas.

La Tabla 2 muestra los resultados de las investigaciones experimentales dirigidas a determinar las relaciones entre la resistencia a la penetración, medida con sondas de diferentes dimensiones geométricas, con el índice de cono ASABE y con la densidad aparente seca del suelo.

TABLA 2. 

Relación entre la resistencia a la penetración obtenida con sondas de diferente geometría con el índice de cono ASABE y la densidad aparente seca, para dos niveles de humedad

Tipo de sonda

  • Hume-dad

  • H (%)

  • Índice de cono ASABE

  • IC(MPa)

  • Densidad Aparente Seca

  • γ (g/cm3)

Ec. RegresiónR2GradoEc. RegresiónR2Grado
Cono ASABE 30ox13028y = 11,874 x - 11,4410,66MF
35y = 1,4787x - 1,08150,16D
Cono 30ox26028y = 0,777 x - 0,03830,86F*y = 8,2556x - 7,82310,60MF
35y = 0,585 x + 0,10980,88Fy = 0,7504x - 0,42740,17D
Cono 30ox52028y = 0,5113x + 0,01230,93FFy = 5,4367x -5,14940,47D
35y = 0,6191x + 0,04070,94FFy = 1,5109x -1,42570,70MF
Cono 45ox26028y = 1,0719x + 0,0620,89Fy = 14,566x - 14,1040,33D
35y = 0,903x + 0,16440,86Fy = 1,8399x - 1,46920,33D
Cono 60ox26028y = 0,8931x + 0,6050,94FFy = 13,807x - 13,3070,81F
35y = 0,3596x + 0,42210,20Dy = 1,1293x - 0,70990,30D
Cuña 30ox13028y = 1,0121x + 0,06340,74MFy = 11,743 x -11,1960,72MF
35y = 0,8559x + 0,16980,87Fy = 0,4806x + 0,20960,01D
Cuña 30ox26028y = 0,806 x - 0,040,94FFy = 9,0656 x -8,67950,75MF
35y = 0,9892x + 0,01110,60MFy = 4,6887 x -4,68430,67MF
Cuña 30ox52028y = 0,8587x + 0,04560,93FFy = 10,914x -10,5810,84F
35y = 0,5995x + 0,12240,95FFy = 1,483x -1,1380,33D

*Leyenda para el grado de relación entre las variables: FF-significativamente fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,90); F-fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,80); MF- medianamente fuerte (R2 ≥ 0,60); D- débil (R2 ≤ 0,59).

* Legend for degree of correlation: FF-significantly strong (R2 ≥ 0.90); F-strong (R2 ≥ 0.80); moderately strong MF- (R2 ≥ 0.60); D- weak (R2 ≤ 0.59).

Según se aprecia en la Tabla anterior, la mayor parte de las geometrías ensayadas presentaron un fuerte grado de correlación con el índice de cono ASABE para los dos niveles de humedad experimentados, con la excepción de la cuña con área de la base de 260 mm2 a humedad de 35% y la cuña de 130 mm2 a humedad de 28%, que presentaron un grado de correlación medianamente fuerte. Constituyó asimismo una excepción, el cono de 60o, cuyo grado de correlación resultó débil para una humedad del 35%.

En la Figura 3 se muestra el ploteo de los puntos experimentales, así como la línea de mejor ajuste para el caso del cono y la cuña con ángulos de 30º y área de la base 520 mm2, para los cuales fueron obtenidos los grados más fuertes de correlación con el índice de cono ASABE, para ambos niveles de humedad, resultando coeficientes de determinación entre R2=0,93 y R2=0,95.

FIGURA 3. 

Ecuación de regresión y coeficiente de determinación entre el índice de cuña (IW) obtenido con una cuña de 30ox520 mm2 y el índice de cono (IC) ASABE para cada uno de los niveles de humedad en estudio.

Los análisis de correlación entre la resistencia a la penetración, obtenida con las diferentes sondas, y la densidad aparente, presentaron un comportamiento más diferenciado, obteniéndose grados fuertes de correlación sólo en el caso de la cuña de 30o x 520 mm2 y el cono de 60o x 260 mm2, en los que el coeficiente de determinación R2 resultó de 0,84 y 0,81 respectivamente, para el nivel de humedad de 28%. En los tratamientos con el nivel alto de humedad (35%), sólo se obtuvo grados de correlación medianamente fuertes con la densidad aparente para los casos del cono de 30o x 520 mm2 y la cuña de 30o x 260 mm2.

Con relación al índice de cono ASABE y su correlación con la densidad aparente, los resultados de los experimentos mostraron una débil correlación (R2=0,16) para el nivel alto de humedad y una correlación medianamente fuerte (R2=0,60) para la humedad de 28% (Figura 4). Resultados similares, fueron obtenidos por Vega (2008) durante la toma de muestras continuada del índice de cono en suelos Ferralíticos Rojos en áreas cañeras de la provincia Mayabeque, mientras que Hall y Raper (2005) reportan, un coeficiente de determinación similar entre el índice de cono y la densidad aparente (R2=0,55), pero para un suelo arenoso-limoso (71,6% arena; 17,4% limo; 11% arcilla).

FIGURE 4. 

Ecuación de regresión y coeficiente de determinación entre el índice de cono ASABE y la densidad aparente para cada uno de los niveles de humedad en estudio.

Estos resultados contrastan con los obtenidos para otro tipo de suelo por Ramírez y Salazar (2006), quienes reportan, para un Andisol (Marinilla-La Montañita, Colombia) una estrecha relación (R2 = 0.95) de la densidad aparente con la resistencia a la penetración obtenida con un penetrómetro de cono de 30o y 10 mm de diámetro en la base, dentro de un rango de experimentación con densidades entre 0,3 y 1,0 g∙cm-3 y resistencia a la penetración entre 2,0 y 4,2 MPa.

Del mismo modo los resultados obtenidos muestran, que la resistencia a la penetración obtenida con la sonda prismática en forma de cuña de 30o x 520 mm2, presentó los mayores grados de correlación, tanto con el índice de cono ASABE, para ambos niveles de humedad, como con la densidad aparente para el nivel de humedad de 28% (Figura 5).

FIGURA 5. 

Ecuación de regresión y coeficiente de determinación entre el índice de cuña (IW) obtenido con una cuña de 30ox520 mm2y la densidad aparente para cada uno de los niveles de humedad en estudio.

Resultados similares, aunque en un tipo de suelo arenoso-limoso (71,6% arena; 17,4% limo; 11% arcilla), reportaron Hall y Raper (2005), quienes obtuvieron mayores valores del coeficiente de determinación (R2=0,74) con una sonda prismática en forma de cuña de 30o x 620 mm2 de área de la base.

La sonda prismática en forma de cuña con ángulo de 30o y área de la base de 520 mm2, presentó los más altos niveles de correlación con el índice de cono ASABE (R2 = 0,95) y la densidad aparente (R2 = 0,84), para una humedad del 28%. De aquí que esta sonda presenta las mejores características para la detección de la resistencia a la penetración de un suelo Ferralítico Rojo Lixiviado, típico de Cuba, ya que brindaría información, no sólo relativa a la resistencia a la penetración, sino también relativa a la densidad aparente del suelo, en este caso efectuando la medición a niveles de humedad, alrededor del 28%.

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.